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Najbolji zvuk ikad koji je neki Ferari ispustio u Monci je:

 

 

Lektira, dobri moj Radoje 😀

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Uz duzno postovanje Radoje zaboravio si da pomenes sramno ponasanje Dzekija Stjuarta na trci u Zandvoortu 1973 godine kada je sebe degradirao i kao vozaca f1,a i pre svega kao coveka,i ne samo on nego citava elita tadasnjih vozaca je prosla mrtvo hladno pored svog kolege koji je ziv gorio u prevrnutom bolidu i niko nije stao da pomogne osim JEDNOG VOZACA!!!                            

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Ostar start na samom pocetku utakmice, u stilu Vinija Dzonsa! 😉

 

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Some people criticized the other drivers for not stopping during the accident to help. However, they assumed it was Purley trying to right his own car. It was common then for privateers such as Purley to try and save their cars from damage, and when they saw Purley they assumed he was doing it to save his car, not someone else's life.

 

https://bleacherreport.com/articles/539314-formula-1-and-its-most-disgraceful-moment-when-lives-meant-virtually-nothing

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Kad vec pomenusmo Stratosa, malo je poznato da je ovo radjeno s istom namerom - da bude Fijatov takmac u reli-takmicenjima:

 

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No kad se pojavio Stratos koji je bio savrsenstvo u svakom pogledu nije bilo potrebe za alternativom iz iste firme tako da je X1/9 ostao pomalo zaboravljen. Inace postojalo je nekoliko trkackih paketa za njega a najpoznatiji su ovaj od Dalare:

 

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I ovaj od Abarta:

ebay-fiat-x19-abarth-prototipo-04.jpg

 

Nije ni ovo lose izgledalo ali Stratos nema premca!:classic_love:

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Thompson Challenger I and Challenger II LSR cars on show at Motorsports Hall of Fame

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By: RACER Staff | 24 hours ago
 

A pair of all-American Land Speed Record cars representing the past and present glory of man’s never-ending pursuit of speed are headed to the Motorsports Hall of Fame of America (MSHFA) at Daytona International Speedway.
 

Danny Thompson, son of the late Mickey Thompson (MSHFA Class of 1990), is delivering this week to the MSHFA both his father’s 1960s era Challenger I as well as his own world-record-setting Challenger II. Both cars will be on loan to the MSHFA and on display for a limited time starting this Monday.
 

To celebrate the arrival, Thompson will be the featured guest in an open-to-the-public presentation at the MSHFA focused on his family’s lifelong fascination with speed and the story behind Challenger II’s incredible world-record run into the history books at 448.757 mph last year on the legendary Bonneville Salt Flats (pictured at top).
 

Scheduled to be held in the Hall’s Petersen Theater, the presentation takes place this Monday, May 13 at 7 p.m. EDT. Admission is $10 in advance or at the doors of the MSHFA, a non-profit 501(c)(3) through the Motorsports Museum Foundation, that has been in operation since 1989.
 

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Setting 295 records at Bonneville alone, Mickey Thompson held more speed and endurance records than any other man in the world. A diverse and multi-talented motorsports personality, as a driver Thompson won races and championships in everything from midgets to sports cars. He was also a mechanical innovator, designer and master promoter who founded SCORE International and stadium off-road racing through the Mickey Thompson Entertainment Group.
 

It was Thompson’s dream of becoming the fastest man alive, however, that drove him to design and build Challenger I in the garage of his California home. Its four supercharged Pontiac engines produced a combined 2,000 hp that was enough, in September of 1960 at Bonneville, for Thompson to go faster than anyone had before: 406.60 mph. The incredible triumph wasn’t an official record, though, because an engine problem prevented completion of a required return run.
 

Thompson returned to Bonneville with the Autolite Special (pictured below) in 1968 for another shot at the piston-powered Land Speed Record only to see his plans washed out by flooding on the salt flats. The car then sat for more than 30 years until son Danny restored it and made attempts of his own.
 

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Renamed Challenger II, the car is remarkably the same as it was when Mickey Thompson designed and drove it. The original Ford 427s were swapped for two 2,500 hp aluminum Hemi engines, but underneath it was the same chassis with the same aerodynamic body work tying it all together. During Bonneville Speed Week 2018, Danny made both his and his father’s dreams come true, setting a new world record of 448.757 mph in Challenger II.
 

danny.jpg?w=800&h=456

Danny Thompson today owns both Challengers that are presently being driven from the West Coast to Daytona Beach and the MSHFA.
 

 

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Nikada nisam nešto gotivio Pikea (Radoje će to mnogo bolje objasniti zašto), ali neke njegove izjave su briljantne.

"Ko je bolji Sena ili vi? Ja sam živ." "Berger je najbolji u F1, nikad nije ništa osvojio, a dobija gomile novca"  itd.

Ali scena gde u slabijem bolidu pod blokiranim točkovima i u driftu pokazuje Seni "the finger" dok ga obilazi, pokazuje sav talenat za volanom.

Meni ipak omiljen njegov postupak kad je doveo kao od majke obučenu devojku na start trke u F3. Na starom forumu je neko i objavio tu fotku...

 

 

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piquetindy.jpg

 

1992. i kraj Pikeove trkacke karijere, u pokusaju da se kvalifikuje za Indi 500 doslo je do havarije na ogibljenju bolida koja ga je bacila ceono na zid. Udes je bio toliko snazan da je on kacigom udario u zid. Cinjenica da je danas ziv i da hoda "na sopstveni pogon" je ravna cudu.

Pike je kao karakter bio prgav i prljav, konstantno u psiholoskim igricama, prozivanje ostalih vozaca za kojesta, insinuacije o seksualnom opredeljenju, vredjanje porodice, nije bilo granice koju ne bi presao samo da se uvuce nekome pod kozu da bi ga destabilizovao. I na stazi je bio siledzija, cukao se tockovima, gurao, isecao. Ali da je bio majstor volana, da je umeo da stavi bolid tamo gde mu mesto nije i da ga iskontrolise i odrzi tamo, to mu niko ne moze poreci.

I imao je muda kao lubenice.

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Gene Romero 1947 – 2019

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By: Robin Miller | May 13, 2019 1:04 PM

 

 

He excelled in an era when everybody drove a van to the races with their bike inside and lived for the moment. No 401k’s, no insurance, no PR people and no worries. Gene Romero, the 1970 American Motorcycle Association champion who died on Sunday at the age of 72 after an illness, exemplified the free spirits that made up the AMA’s flat trackers in the ’60s and ’70s.

 

“We had a lot of fun running together,” said Chuck Palmgren, a flat track front runner whose career spanned 15 years and was one of Romero’s best friends. “Gene was good at a lot of places, TTs and road courses and he understood the Miles pretty well. Those were the best of times, because gas was 25 cents a gallon and hotel rooms were $20, and you could make a little money and have fun doing it.

 

“I talked to him a week ago when he was in the hospital and I knew he was done. Our conversations usually lasted two or three hours, with him doing most of the talking, but he was out of breath and coughing and it was a quick conversation, so I just said goodbye.”

 

Nicknamed “Burrito” by frame designer Ray Hensley, the Mexican-American rider began riding professionally in 1967 and captured the AMA title three years later. He was well versed on dirt and pavement, capturing 12 AMA nationals and also the Daytona 200 in 1975. He retired in 1981 and was inducted into the Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 1998.

 

After his motorcycle career, he tried Super Vees and USAC midgets but never quite got comfortable with four wheels.

 

But he was just as comfortable laying down his motorcycle at 130mph into a turn at the Indiana State Fairgrounds’ mile dirt track as he was holding court with the boys, and just as entertaining doing both. He made lots of friends in IndyCar racing like Jimmy Caruthers and Johnny Parsons, and his outgoing personality made him one of the first bikers to ever land sponsorships.

 

“We were all hoping he’d just fouled a plug and he would bounce back,” said Palmgren, who has worked at Dan Gurney’s All-American Racers the past four decades. “But he lived a helluva life, and nobody had any more fun.”
 

 

 

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Niki Lauda 1949 - 2019

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It is with enormous sadness that I must report the death of Niki Lauda, a giant in the world of motor racing - and in business - at the age of only 70. The Austrian underwent a lung transplant eight months ago, but struggled to recover. He had previously undergone two kidney transplants.

 

The sport has lost a man who truly was a living legend, a phrase that is much misused. Nicknamed The Rat because of his pragmatic ways, Niki was an inspiration to generations of race fans after his extraordinary comeback after a fiery accident during the 1976 German Grand Prix that summer, which left him permanently scarred yet unbowed. He returned to the cockpit at Monza in September that year and continued to fight James Hunt for the World Championship until the season finale in the rain in Japan, where he made the courageous decision to retire his car because he felt conditions were too dangerous to continue.

 

"His unique achievements as an athlete and entrepreneur are and will remain unforgettable, his tireless zest for action, his straightforwardness and his courage remain a role model and a benchmark for all of us," his family said in a statement.

 

Lauda was always brutally honest and forthright. If you wanted to know the truth, you asked Niki. He was never one to suffer fools but once you earned his trust, he was a firm friend and advisor, his sharp mind analysing problems in a way that often seemed brutal, but which was a key to his incredible success on the race track and in the business world.

 

Lauda was born into a wealthy family in Vienna but rather than going into the world of finance, he decided he wanted to race, despite opposition from his parents. With help from his grandmother he bought a Mini and started competing and gradually climbed the racing ladder, borrowing money to do so. He arrived in F1 with a March at the Austrian GP in 1971 and graduated full time in 1972. Although the team did well in F2, the F1 programme was a disaster and the team did not pay much attention to someone they saw as being a pay-driver.

 

He took out another loan to get a drive with BRM in 1973 where he showed his pace alongside former Ferrari driver Clay Regazzoni. When the Swiss driver went back to Ferrari in 1974 team boss Enzo Ferrari asked him what he thought of Lauda and Regazzoni’s opinion was such that Ferrari decided to sign Niki as well. Lauda repaid his debts and Ferrari’s faith in him by winning the 1975 World Championship. He was fighting for the championship again in 1976 when he crashed at the old Nürburgring in August and was trapped in his flaming car. Rescued by other drivers, notably Arturo Merzario, he had suffered terrible burns and was not expected to live. He was administered the Last Rites but he fought back, overcame his fears and fought for the title. The story was told in the 2013 Ron Howard film Rush.

 

Despite a strained relationship with Ferrari, Lauda showed he had lost none of his pace when he won the World Championship for a second time in 1977 but then quit Ferrari to join Bernie Ecclestone’s Brabham team.

 

He retired from F1 in true Lauda style, deciding he had had enough of “driving around in circles” at the Canadian GP in 1979 and he set about building an empire in aviation. Lauda Air was a great success, with previously unseen levels of service at reasonable prices. He worked with a catering firm called Do&Co and later introduced the company to F1 to cater for the Paddock Club VIP hospitality, a role it continues to fulfil today. 

 

He came out of retirement in 1982 after McLaren’s Ron Dennis convinced him to race for the Woking team, with its revolutionary carbon fibre composite car. He signed what is believed to have been the biggest driver contract at that point - at $3 million a year. He finished fifth that year and in 1984 battled Alain Prost for the World Championship, winning by half a point. It was the narrowest margin of title victory ever.

 

Lauda quit F1 again at the end of the 1985 season and went back to his airline. In May 1991 one his planes flying from Hong Kong to Vienna crashed in Thailand after a thrust reverser was deployed in flight without the pilots being involved. The Boeing 767 went out of control and broke up in flight, killing all 213 passengers and the 10 crew members on board. Lauda went to the site of the crash to try to understand what had happened, attended funerals of the victims and fought Boeing to get the truth. This resulted in the firm issuing a statement that the crew could not have saved the plane and modifying the thrust reverser system to prevent the same thing happening again.

 

Lauda was then asked by his old Ferrari boss Luca Montezemolo to act as an advisor in rebuilding Ferrari, although he departed soon after the new team manager Jean Todt took over. He sold Lauda Air to rival Austrian Airlines in 1999 and would return to F1 In 2001 working with Ford and was the boss of Jaguar Racing for a season before falling victim to political machinations within the car company. He then started a new airline called Niki in 2003, while working as an analyst on the German TV channel RTL's F1 coverage. In 2011 he sold Niki to Air Berlin but later retook control of the business under the Laudamotion name.

 

In September 2012, he was appointed a non-executive director of the Mercedes F1 team and played a key role in the signing of Lewis Hamilton to replace Michael Schumacher. When the ream was restructured early in 2013, he became a 10 percent shareholder in the team and was named non-executive chairman, helping Toto Wolff to build the team that has dominated the sport since 2014. It was not an easy relationship at the start as Wolff felt that Lauda was not enough of a team player and so fined him €50 whenever he said “I” instead of “we”. Lauda would eventually tell the team that his success with Mercedes meant more to him than all his own driving achievements.

 

In July 2018, Niki was diagnosed with a severe lung infection and underwent a double lung transplant but hoped to return to the team this year. Sadly his health remained frail and he has spent the last months in and out of hospitals with illnesses and kidney problems.

 

Lauda leaves his wife Birgit, their twins Max and Mia - born in 2009, two sons (Mathias and Lukas) from his first wife Marlene Knaus, and a son - Christoph - born from another relationship.
 

 

 

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Pre neki dan umro je i Nevil Lederle, koji definitivno nije bio ni blizu talentom i uspesima Niki Laudi ali je ipak imao interesantnu trkacku karijeru.

lederle.jpg

 

Rodjen 1938, poceo je da se takmici na lokalnoj sceni u Juznoj Africi 50-tih godina proslog veka da bi se 1961. ukljucio u novoformirani nacionalni sampionat F1. Poput poznatije Tasman serije (gde su vozeni stari bolidi F1, nakon promene pravila i proglasavanja dotadasnje F2 specifikacije za F1) i juznoafricki F1 sampionat je vozen tokom zimske pauze u "velikom" svetskom sampionatu te je zato privlacio i najveca imena tog vremena poput Klarka, Mosa i ostalih. Promena pravila je znacila da su se mnogi dotadasnji F2 bolidi, sto kupljeni u Evropi sto proizvedeni u kucnoj radinosti odjednom kvalifikovali za F1 sampionate pa je i Lederle sa svojim privatnim Lotusom okusao srecu. Iako nije ostvario znacajnije rezultate zbog cestih kvarova, njegove voznje su ipak zapale za oko jednom od najjacih trkackih timova u Juznoj Africi - Skuderiji Skribante. Sa njima se Lederle kvalifikuje za VN Juzne Afrike 1962. koja se bodovala za svetski sampionat i na svom debiju uzima 6. mesto i jedan bod.
Naredne 1963. sa Skuderikom Skribante uzima nacionalni sampionat Juzne Afrike a te iste godine dozivljava tezak udes na trci spotskih prototipova 9h Randa zbog cega propusta VN Juzne Afrike. Vraca se pred kraj sezone 1964 nacionalnog sampionata u zimu (bez bitnijih rezlultata) da bi s proleca 1965. pokusao ponovo da se kvalifikuje za VN Juzne Afrike. Ostaje prvi ispod crte, i tu secajuci da fizicki vise nije spreman za takmicenje na visokom nivou odlucuje da batali aktivno trkanje i posveti se biznisu. Nakon ovoga pojavljivao se neko vreme na susretima veterana ali dugogodisnji problemi sa zdravljem zbog posledica udesa iz 1963. ga konacno potpuno odvajaju od auto-sporta...

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