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Posted (edited)
19 hours ago, Radoye said:

Rezervni vozac Marko Milosevic.

 

A da ode citav sport u bankrot. Zar nije razbio dovoljno kola po BG? :classic_biggrin:

Edited by zoran59

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The Formula 1 Grand Prix of Miami suffered a setback on Tuesday when the board of county commissioners of Miami Dade County in Florida voted to introduce a few more hurdles to the process required to run the event in May 2021. The promoters - basically the Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens - want to get things moving with the required permits so that work can begin after the stadium hosts the Super Bowl on February 2 next year.

 

There were two votes that were important, but both of them can be vetoed by the Mayor Carlos Giménez, if he announces the veto within 10 days of the vote. Giménez has been one of the biggest supporters of getting a race into the Miami area. His veto can be overruled by the Commission if it can get a two-thirds majority, which means nine votes. For the moment the opponents of the race do not have the votes to force the measures through.

 

The first vote was for an County ordinance and it means that the stadium has to go through more processes in order to get the go-ahead for a Formula 1 race. The result is that there must now be a public hearing, which has been scheduled for December 10. The hearing will be hosted by the County’s Infrastructure & Capital Improvements committee. The vote was close and was passed by only seven votes to six.

 

The second vote was for a resolution to create a county-wide policy to prohibit temporary or permanent road closures for motor racing events on any and all county roads that go through or pass by residential districts. In order to get permission to do this, applicants would have to provide and pay for a number of studies which would then be considered the Commission. This would not stop the Hard Rock Stadium from redesigning the track and using only private land, but there is no intention to do this because of the investment required to redesign the planned track and alter parts of the facility in order to do that. The resolution was passed by eight votes to five and once again the mayor has the right to veto.

 

The red tape is obviously annoying but F1 is still cautiously confident that the event will go ahead. There was a large contingent of people involved in the Miami event in Mexico City at the weekend. The biggest problem is that delays resulting from bureaucracy will mean that time will run out to get everything done in time for May 2021. If this happens the stadium is likely to give up with its bid, leaving Miami without an F1 race, and Formula 1 without its desired second event in the United States. There is still a project under development in Las Vegas and there is a danger that Miami will lose its chance if the politicians procrastinate and try to hobble the race. The Commission meeting highlighted the fact that some of its members really have no clue about what they are voting on. The commissioner for the Homestead district argued that the F1 race could move to his area, showing that he has no clue about how the events are funded and organised. The decibels of modern F1 cars were wildly overstated by those opposed to the race, while one commissioner said that despite the previous races on the streets of Miami, F1 had never been there, but added that there had been Formula 2 races - which of course is complte rubbish.

 

The hearings were attended by F1’s commercial boss Sean Bratches, who then headed off for the F1 street festival in Hollywood, where Valtteri Bottas, Max Verstappen and Daniel Ricciardo will drive old F1 cars on Hollywood Boulevard tomorrow evening. The event is taking place outside the celebrated Grauman’s Chinese Theatre, where the Hollywood Walk of Fame is located.

 

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A Formula 1 car is a complex piece of machinery and all the different systems on it do sometimes disrupt one another. The cars have a great deal of electrical noise - undesirable electrical signals - which can distort or interfere with the desired signals. This is vary hard to master.

 

On Saturday morning in Austin, the FIA issued a technical directive to the F1 teams detailing a system that Red Bull had proposed that might have allowed the team to run more than the allowed amount of fuel flow, based on using electircal noise to disrupt the sample pulses sent from the fuel flow metering units, that make sure the teams do not use too much fuel. The system was, of course, rejected by the FIA as being illegal.

 

It is clear, however, that Red Bull did this for a reason, knowing the suggestion would be rejected, but in order to have the FIA clarify what was acceptable and what was not acceptable. And thus draw a line in the sand. Red Bull is believed to have suspected that other teams might be using such a system, or something similar to it. Using more than the allowed fuel flow could create a situation in which a team might be able to burn more fuel at certain points in a race weekend, which would give the engine a little bit of extra power when it was most needed, particularly when accelerating at slow speeds, which would allow the car to carry the additional speed up through the acceleration curve and so produce a higher top speed.

 

It seems that the system that Red Bull created, based on experiments it conducted, allowed pulses going from the fuel flow-metre, which samples what is going on, to be disrupted by external electrical “noise”.

 

This grey area has now been closed and it will be interesting to see if it has any impact on the different levels of performance of the different F1 teams.

 

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Lewis Hamilton says Ferrari’s straight-line speed is not as strong at this weekend’s race after the FIA clarified an area of the technical regulations.

 

The sport’s governing body issued a technical directive which informs teams how it intends to interpret an area of the regulations, in this case relating to power unit design. Ferrari’s impressive power unit performance has been a matter of close scrutiny by rival teams and the directive is believed to have been prompted by a query from Red Bull.

 

“What’s come out this week has been quite interesting to see,” said Hamilton. “Obviously today I think they’ve lost a bit of power. I’m interested to see how that continues and how it reflects in the race tomorrow.”

 

However Hamilton said he’s “not sure” whether it will be any easier to overtake the Ferraris in the race. “They’re still quite quicker than us generally in the straights.

 

“Hopefully our car will be strong throughout the race tomorrow. Yesterday’s running was good today was a little bit difficult, hopefully tomorrow’s better.”

Ferrari failed to take pole position for the first time since the Hungarian Grand Prix in July, but Mercedes team principal Toto Wolff said this was not necessarily a consequence of the technical directive.

 

“Certainly the three teams were much closer together in terms of straight-line performance here in the US,” said Wolff. “But I wouldn’t say this is down to any specific event. It’s just a fact that we’ve won our first pole position since July, since Hockenheim, and we are really in the mix.”

 

“I think it’s very strong that the FIA issued a TD clarifying the situation with some very clear wording,” he added. “But this is a process that is standard, happened before and part of the role of the governing body.”

 

 

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Ferrari team principal Mattia Binotto has hit back at rumors and comments about his team’s performance loss in the United States Grand Prix following the publication of a technical directive.

 

The FIA issued a technical directive ahead of the race weekend relating to the way fuel flow is measured, following a request from Red Bull. Lewis Hamilton then stated it would be interesting to see how Ferrari performs after the technical directive, and with Charles Leclerc comfortably off the pace during the race while Sebastian Vettel retired, Max Verstappen then insinuated the lack of competitiveness was due to the FIA’s move.

 

“I read and I heard a lot of comments this weekend about a technical directive and the impact on our cars,” Binotto said. “I heard comments at the end of the race, which I feel very disappointing. As a matter of fact, I believe yesterday we have been very close to the pole position as it has been in the last races.

“I think that Seb could have scored the pole yesterday, maybe he was a bit too much cautious in one corner. Charles had a clear problem in the morning, losing completely FP3, we fitted a downgrade on the engine in the car, and overall I think that looking at his performance in Q3 and what could have been done without the issue in the morning, I’m pretty sure that as well he was potentially in the fight for pole as well. So I don’t see where is the problem.

“If we look at the race today, we may comment later on, but certainly the speed on the straights was not our issue, while we’ve got clear problems on the grip on the car first stint both drivers. Again it’s type of comments I feel are completely wrong. It’s not good for the sport and I think everybody should be a bit more cautious.”

 

And Binotto insists Ferrari has yet to give the technical directive a thorough look, saying he is unsure how it may impact the team and in which sessions.

“Honestly we will look through the technical directive,” Binotto said. “We have not done it this weekend in detail, we’ve seen I think it’s number 35 of the season. It’s a process where teams may ask clarification to the FIA, and the FIA is replying. Will it have impact in the race or qualifying? I don’t know, not able to answer you.”

 

One problem Ferrari clearly had was with Vettel’s right rear suspension when it failed exiting Turn 9, with Binotto adding it still needs to analyze the incident fully.

 

“No explanation yet,” Binotto stated. “Not clear even if the suspension as broken since the very start, could be, initial feeling was something was wrong with the car so maybe it was broken. But from the data and when it has been broken it’s not clear yet.”

 

 

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The prototype tyres for the 2020 F1 season which were tested by drivers during practice at the Circuit of the Americas received a largely negative response.

 

Teams were given extra, unmarked sets of the new compounds to run during today’s two practice sessions, which were run in unusually cool conditions. McLaren’s Carlos Sainz Jnr, who did seven laps on the prototype tyre in first practice, but said it was “not very productive for me.”

 

“We tried to measure sure those tyres with a lot of sensors,” Sainz explained, but said they “felt very weird and very bad.”

 

Haas’s Romain Grosjean wasn’t impressed either after doing six laps on the new rubber. “If you put the stickers on the side of them I don’t see the difference,” he said.

 

“We used the two proto[types] in the morning, had a good check. They not any better, so a bit disappointing in that aspect.”

 

Kimi Raikkonen covered just four laps on the prototypes. “We only did a few laps on it,” he explained. “It felt very normal, not an awful lot different to what we have now.”

 

The Mercedes drivers spent much of first practice running on the prototype rubber. Lewis Hamilton, who did 13 laps on the tyres, said he wasn’t allowed to discuss their findings. “I’ve got to hold back and not say too much at the moment,” he said.

 

 

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Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez has today used his veto to overturn opposition to the planned Formula 1 race at the Hard Rock Stadium, the home of the Miami Dolphins. This is situated in Miami Gardens, where the local County Commissioner Barbara Jordan has led opposition to the event.

 

Jordan’s proposals to make things difficult for the event were passed at the end of October by the Miami-Dade County Commissioners with votes of 7-6 and 8-5. The mayor had 10 days in which to veto the decisions. He can be overruled if there are nine votes against him, but this is not the case as of today.

 

Gimenez said that he has had a meeting with race opponents, Jordan and Dolphins representatives and that he hopes that they will find a way to compromise so that the county can host what is a major global sporting event.

 

Part of the problem has been education with some wild claims by opponents of the race about the noise levels involved, which clearly are way in excess of what F1 produces today.

Since 2014 the noise of the engines has been much reduced, to such an extent that it is not unusual for F1 people to not even notice when a session has begun, because of the quieter engines.

 

There is also a need for the local residents to understand the benefits that come from an F1 race, which have been seen in places such as Melbourne, where F1 has acted to improve the reputation of a neighbourhood and thus raise the house prices.

 

There is also great potential for locals to make money by renting out properties when the races are on, as hotel prices tend to get very high when F1 goes to any city and thus fans and even F1 people turn to using private residences. The number of people who will be affected by the race is very limited.

 

It would be hard to find a location with fewer residents being impacted anywhere in developed southern Florida, although perhaps Homestead might be able to match such a claim.

The sad news is that it costs a great deal of money to host an F1 race and so it will either happen at the Hard Rock Stadium (which is willing to pay) or it will not happen at all.

 

Gimenez believes that Miami will benefit from an F1 race if the locals are reasonable and listen to the arguments put forward. If not, F1 will look elsewhere and take its many benefits to a city that will appreciate what it has to offer. Las Vegas is waiting in the wings

 

 

 

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The news that Formula 1 has a “sustainability plan” to have a net-zero carbon footprint by 2030 is the start of a campaign to give the sport a more environmentally-friendly image. It is long overdue, particularly in the light of the extraordinary achievements in engine efficiency since the new formula began in 2014.

 

The hybrid power unit will play a key role in the future of the automotive industry and the current F1 hybrid power unit, delivering more power using less fuel than any other car, combined with advanced sustainable fuels and energy recovery systems presents a tremendous opportunity to deliver a net-zero carbon hybrid power unit.

 

This new initiative will cover the Formula 1 cars and on-track activity and the rest of the operations as a sport.

 

The plan comes after twelve months of intense work with the FIA, sustainability experts, Formula 1 teams, promoters, and partners, resulting in an ambitious, yet achievable delivery plan. Carbon reduction projects will begin immediately to start the journey of becoming a more sustainable sport.

 

Formula 1 has been at the forefront of technological innovation throughout its history with advancements that have directly benefitted the wider automotive industry. Aerodynamic innovations, safety developments, energy recovery systems, navigation tools and composite materials from F1 have been adopted by the road car and other industries.

 

The initiatives will include action to ensure we move to ultra-efficient logistics and travel and 100 percent renewably powered offices, facilities and factories. And by 2025 all events will be sustainable. This will mean the use of sustainable materials at all events with single-use plastics being eliminated and all waste reused, recycled or composted. Additionally, we will provide incentives and tools to offer every fan a greener way to reach the races.

 

“Few people know that the current F1 hybrid power unit is the most efficient in the world, delivering more power using less fuel, and hence CO2, than any other car,” says Chase Carey. “We believe F1 can continue to be a leader for the auto industry and work with the energy and automotive sector to deliver the world’s first net zero carbon hybrid internal combustion engine that hugely reduces carbon emissions around the world.”

 

“In launching F1’s first-ever sustainability strategy, we recognise the critical role that all organisations must play in tackling this global issue. By leveraging the immense talent, passion and drive for innovation held by all members of the F1 community, we hope to make a significant positive impact on the environment and communities in which we operate.”

 

 

 

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